C c ognitive ognitive p p sychology and and



Descargar 2.97 Mb.
Ver original pdf
Página1/83
Fecha de conversión19.05.2019
Tamaño2.97 Mb.
Vistas230
Descargas0
Publicado porroberto.tait
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   83


C
C
OGNITIVE
OGNITIVE
 P
 P
SYCHOLOGY
SYCHOLOGY
 
 
AND
AND
 
 
C
C
OGNITIVE
OGNITIVE
 N
 N
EUROSCIENCE
EUROSCIENCE
by Wikibooks contributors
Developed on 
Wikibooks
,
the open-content textbooks collection


© Copyright 2004–2006, Wikibooks contributors.
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free 
Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no 
Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. A copy of the license is included in the 
section entitled "GNU Free Documentation License".
Image licenses are listed in the section entitled "Image Credits."
Main authors: 
Aschoeke
 (
C
)   
Tbittlin
 (
C
)   
LanguageGame
 (
C
)   
Itiaden
 (
C
)   
Pbenner
 (
C
) · 
Mheimann
 (
C

Jkeyser
 (
C
)   
Ddeunert
 (
C
)   
Marplogm
 (
C
) · 
Pehrenbr
 (
C
)   
Ifranzme
 (
C
)   
FlyingGerman
 (
C
)   
Sspoede
 (
C
) · 
Asarwary
 (
C
)   
Lbartels
 (
C
)   
Smieskes
 (
C
)   
Apape
 (
C
) · 
Ekrueger
 (
C
)
The current version of this Wikibook may be found at:
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cognitive_Psychology_and_Cognitive_Neuroscience


Contents
C
HAPTERS
..............................................................................................................................4
01 Cognitive Psychology and the Brain
................................................................................................ 4
02 Problem Solving from an Evolutionary Perspective
........................................................................ 8
03 Evolutionary Perspective on Social Cognitions
............................................................................. 25
04 Behavioral and Neuroscience Methods
..........................................................................................33
05 Motivation and Emotion
.................................................................................................................47
06 Memory
.......................................................................................................................................... 57
07 Memory and Language
...................................................................................................................66
08 Imagery
...........................................................................................................................................73
09 Comprehension
...............................................................................................................................81
10 Neuroscience of Comprehension
....................................................................................................94
11 Situation Models and Inferencing
................................................................................................ 109
12 Knowledge
....................................................................................................................................125
13 Decision Making and Reasoning
..................................................................................................146
14 Present and Future of Research
.................................................................................................... 168
A
BOUT
 
THE
 
BOOK
............................................................................................................... 177
History & Document Notes
...............................................................................................................177
Authors & Image Credits
.................................................................................................................. 178
GNU Free Documentation License
................................................................................................... 179


Chapter 1
1 C
OGNITIVE
 P
SYCHOLOGY
 
AND
 
THE
 B
RAIN
live version
 • 
discussion
 • 
edit lesson
 • 
comment
 • 
report an error
Introduction
magine a young man, Knut, sitting at his desk, with his tired eyes staring at a monitor, surfing 
around, trying to find some worthy articles for his psychology homework. A cigarette rests between 
the middle and index fingers of his left hand. Without looking, he stretches out his free hand and grabs 
a cup of coffee located on the right of his keyboard. While sipping some of the cheap discounter blend, 
he suddenly asks himself: "What is happening here?"
I
Around the beginning of the 20th century, psychologists would have said, "Take a look into 
yourself, Knut, analyse what you're thinking and doing," as analytical introspection was the method of 
that time.
A   few   years   later,   J.B.   Watson   published   his   book  Psychology   from   the   Standpoint   of   a 
Behaviorist, from which began the era of behaviourism. Behaviourists claimed that it was impossible to 
study the inner life of people scientifically. Their approach to psychology, which they assumed to be 
more scientific, focussed only on the study and experimental analysis of behaviour. The right answer to 
Knut's question would have been: "You are sitting in front of your computer, reading and drinking 
coffee, because of your environment and how it influences you." Behaviorism was the primary means 
for American psychology for about the next 50 years. One of the primary critiques and downfalls of 
behaviorism was Noam Chomsky's 1959 critique of B.F. Skinner's "Verbal behaviour". Skinner, an 
influential  behaviourist,  attempted to explain  language on  the  basis  of  behaviour alone. Chomsky 
showed   that   this   was   impossible,   and   by   doing   so,   influenced   enough   psychologists   to   end   the 
dominance of behaviorism in American psychology.
As   more   researchers   were   once   again   concerned   with   processes   inside   the   head,   cognitive 
psychology arose on the landscape of science. Their central claim was that cognition was information 
processing of the brain. Cognitive psychology did not dispose the methods of behaviourism, but rather 
widened their horizon by adding levels between input and output.
Modern technology and new  methods  enabled researchers  to combine examinations  of public 
actions (latencies in reaction time, number of recalls) with physiological measurements (
EEG
  and 
event-related potentials, 
fMRI
). Such methods, in addition to others, are used by cognitive science to 
collect evidence for certain features of mental activity. From this, references and correlations between 
action and cognition could be made.
These   correlations   were   inspiration   and   thenceforwards   the   main   challenge   for   cognitive 
psychologists. To answer Knut's question the cognitive psychologist would probably first examining 
Knut’s brain in that specific situation. So let's try this!
Knut has a problem, he really needs to do his homework. To solve this problem, he has to perform 
loads of cognition. The light is gleaming into his eyes, transducing it from his retina into nerve signals 
by sensory cells. The information is passed on through the optic nerve, crosses the brain at the lateral 
geniculate nucleus to arrive at the central visual cortex. On its journey, the signals get computed over 
complex nets of neurons; the contrast of the picture gets enhanced; irrelevant information gets filtered 
4 | Cognitive Psychology and Neuroscience



Compartir con tus amigos:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   83


La base de datos está protegida por derechos de autor ©psicolog.org 2017
enviar mensaje

enter | registro
    Página principal


subir archivos